2010 Backcountry Fatality Statistics

As an avid backpacker, I’ve often heard that the number one cause of deaths in the backcountry is falling…or, as I prefer to say: gravity. However, I decided that I wanted to verify this fact. So for the calendar year 2010, I gathered information on backcountry deaths in an effort to determine if falling was in fact the number one cause of backcountry deaths.

Methodology

I first needed to establish criteria for what constituted a backcountry death, and I elected to keep it as generic as possible. Therefore, I decided that any death that did not occur on a road or a parking lot would be a backcountry death. I read about several deaths that occurred just a few hundred yards down a trail and I debated whether or not those should be considered backcountry deaths.  In each case, however, the person died because he had been in the backcountry and had been unable to return to the trailhead. I decided that, for those people, the wilderness near the trailhead was just as wild as the wilderness 10 miles from the trailhead, so I elected to include them in the backcountry statistics.

To gather this information for National Parks, I used Incident Reports from the National Park Service. These reports provided reliable information for all deaths that occurred in National Parks.

Gathering data for the National Forests and State Forests was considerably more difficult, and the data for those locations may not be as complete. In order to gather that information, I created Google News searches involving the following keywords: hiker, dies, killed, lost, and search and rescue. I am confident, however, that I captured the vast majority of backcountry deaths in these locations.

It is important to note that I only gathered information for the United States.

Discussion

As you can see in the following pages, falling was far and away the number one cause of death in the backcountry in 2010.

I’ve been told that it only stands to reason that the majority of deaths would be a result of falling. However, it is important to note two things: 1) There are a whole lot of other causes of death besides falling, suggesting there are still a lot of other ways to get killed in the backcountry. In fact, you’re more likely to die from some other cause than falling, but falling is the single most likely cause of death. 2) Most of the falling deaths do not come from rock climbers. Admittedly, some of the falling deaths are from climbers who almost have no other way of dying in the backcountry, but the majority of the falling deaths come from hikers.

This leads to one important conclusion for me: be careful. I have tried to traverse ledges and rocks that were definitely unsafe, and now I am far more aware of the dangers of gravity in the backcountry. The fact is, you may fall down a short drop-off without the fall killing you, but if you can’t walk out because you’ve broken your legs, then you may die there.

There are a few questions that arise when looking at these statistics. For starters, the second most common cause of death is “Lost”. This category is complicated because the people could have died from any of the other causes, but they were never found, so we can’t know what actually killed them. So the “Lost” category simply means that the people disappeared and their cause of death is unknown. And then there is also an “Unknown” category. This category applies to people who were in the backcountry alone, then they were found, but their cause of death wasn’t obvious. There were only a few of these, and most of them were suspected to be Falls. But since the news reports indicated that the investigators were not positive of the cause of death, I categorized them as “Unknown.”

I want to also make note of the fact that these statistics represent real people. I don’t intend to minimize the tragedy that each of these people, their families, and their friends have endured as a result of these events. I think it’s important that we all remember that this could happen to any of us on any trip. Sometimes, no amount of preparation, skills, gear, or experience will keep you alive in the backcountry. Sometimes it’s just a perfect storm that leads to a death in the backcountry. Therefore, I do not want to minimize the individual tragedies found in these statistics, nor do I want to place blame on any of the individuals. Instead, I hope to gather just a little bit of information that will help me recognize risks when I encounter them.

Anyway, I hope these statistics are useful to others. Gathering the information has certainly made me more sensitive to the risks I undertake when I go into the backcountry.

2010 Backcountry Fatality Causes

CauseNon-parkParkTotal
Falls362561
Lost15419
Drowning01212
Natural Causes8311
Avalanche156
Unknown145
Heart Attack404
Hypothermia314
Lightning022
Rock Slide202
Mudslide202
Suicide112
Bear Attack101
Falling Tree101
Altitude Sickness (HACE)101
Falling Rock101
Heat Stroke011
Animal Attack011

Totals

Park Backcountry Deaths59
Non-Park Backcountry Deaths77
Backcountry Deaths136
Non-Park Backcountry Falls36
Park Backcountry Falls25
Total Backcountry Falls61
Falls % of Backcountry Total Deaths44.85%

Summary

Deadliest ParkRocky Mountain
Deadliest ForestSnoqualmie Forest
White Mountain Forest
Deadliest Location (Park)Golden Gate, Longs Peak, Grand Teton, Mt Rainier
Deadliest State (Park)CA
Deadliest State (Non-Park)CO
Deadliest StateCO, CA
Deadliest Cause (Park)Fall
Deadliest Cause (Non-Park)Fall
Deadliest CauseFall
Deadliest Month (Park)July
Deadliest Month (Non-Park)July
Deadliest MonthJuly
Least Deadliest Month (Park)January, December
Least Deadliest Month (Non-Park)January, February, April

By Month

MonthParkNon-ParkTotal
Jan022
Feb224
Mar459
Apr426
May13518
Jun61016
July151934
Aug358
Sep5712
Oct6915
Nov178
Dec044

By State

StateParkNon-ParkTotal
CA12719
CO61319
WA51015
WY729
UT549
OR268
AK628
AZ257
NY077
NH066
NH066
MT224
GA303
ID033
NV213
NC112
VA112
WI202
HI022
FL101
MO101
TN101
VT011
KY011

By Park

ParkTotal
Rocky Mountain6
Golden Gate NRA5
Denali5
Yellowstone4
Tetons3
Zion3
Yosemite3
Appalachian Trail3
Mount Rainier3
Grand Canyon3
Columbia River Gorge2
Chattahoochee River2
Glacier2
Dry Tortugas1
Ozark Riverway1
Channel Islands1
Smokies1
Timpanogos Cave1
Joshua Tree1
Kings Canyon1
Glen Canyon1
Katmai1
North Cascade1
Apostle Islands Lakeshore1
Lake Meade NRA1
New River Gorge1
Sequoia1
Olympic1

By Non-Park 2+

ForestTotal
Snoqualmie Forest5
White Mountain Forest5
Catskills State Park4
Rio Grande Forest4
Tonto Forest4
Wasatch Forest3
White River Forest3
Makaha Valley State Forest2
Ozarks-St Francis Forest2
Wenatchee Forest2
Willamette Forest2
San Juan Forest2

Similar Posts:

Please follow and like us:

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *